Unreal Nature

December 8, 2016

The Real Is Not Dramatic

Filed under: Uncategorized — unrealnature @ 5:42 am

… Nothing is durable but what is caught up in rhythms. Bend content to form and sense to rhythms.

This is from Notes on the Cinematograph by Robert Bresson (1975). Please note that cinematography for Bresson “has the special meaning of creative filmmaking which thoroughly exploits the nature of film as such. It should not be confused with the work of a cameraman.” And Bresson despises actors, instead using amateurs with no experience whom he calls “models”:

[ … ]

Unbalance so as to re-balance.

[ … ]

Sudden rise of my film when I improvise, decline when I execute.

[ … ]

A small subject can provide the pretext for many profound combinations. Avoid subjects that are too vast or too remote, in which nothing warns you when you are going astray. Or else take from them only what can be mingled with your life and belongs to your experience.

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A single word, a single movement that is not right or is merely in the wrong place gets in the way of all the rest.

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Model. His permanence: always the same way of being different.

[ … ]

Model. All those things you could not conceive of him before, or even during.

Model. Soul, body, both inimitable.

[ … ]

Dig into your sensations. Look at what there is within. Don’t analyse it with words. Translate it into sister images, into equivalent sounds. The clearer it is, the more your style affirms itself. (Style: all that is not technique.)

[ … ]

The omnipotence of rhythms.
Nothing is durable but what is caught up in rhythms. Bend content to form and sense to rhythms.

[ … ]

The sight of movement gives happiness: horse, athlete, bird.

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Not beautiful photography, not beautiful images, but necessary images and photography.

[ … ]

The real is not dramatic. Drama will be born of a certain march of non-dramatic elements.

My previous post from Bresson’s book is here.

-Julie

http://www.unrealnature.com/

 

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